THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONVENTION OF DELEGATES, FROM THE STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, AND RHODE-ISLAND; AND THE COUNTIES OF CHESHIRE AND GRAFTON, IN THE STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE: AND THE COUNTY OF WINDHAM, IN THE STATE OF VERMONT; CONVENED AT HARTFORD, IN THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, DECEMBER 5TH [sic], 1814. American Imprint, War of 1812.

THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONVENTION OF DELEGATES, FROM THE STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, AND RHODE-ISLAND; AND THE COUNTIES OF CHESHIRE AND GRAFTON, IN THE STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE: AND THE COUNTY OF WINDHAM, IN THE STATE OF VERMONT; CONVENED AT HARTFORD, IN THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, DECEMBER 5TH [sic], 1814. Utica: Printed by Merrell and Camp, 1815. Octavo, pp. [1-3] 4-16, disbound. One of many editions printed throughout New England and New York state. The proceedings of a series of secret meetings from 15 December 1814 to 5 January 1815 in Hartford, Connecticut, of Federalist delegates from Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont "who were dissatisfied with Pres. James Madison’s mercantile policies and the progress of the War of 1812 ('Mr. Madison’s War'), as well as long resentful over the balance of political power that gave the South, particularly Virginia, effective control of the national government. The more extreme delegates raised the possibility of secession, but others sought only to dictate amendments to the Constitution that would protect their interests. Ultimately, the convention adopted a strong states’ rights position and expressed its grievances in a series of resolutions against military conscription and commercial regulations (along with some stringent criticisms of Madison’s administration) that were agreed to on January 4, 1815. Even as the convention finished its business, however, a British sloop of war was beating its way across the Atlantic with dispatches containing the peace terms that had been agreed to in the Treaty of Ghent, ending the war. Moreover, as the convention’s emissaries approached Washington, D. C., they were met by the news of Gen. Andrew Jackson’s unexpected victory in the Battle of New Orleans. By the time the emissaries arrived, it was no longer possible to serve the kind of ultimatum contained in the convention’s report. The war, along with the national crisis it had brought about, had ended. The secrecy of the Hartford proceedings also contributed to discrediting the convention, and its unpopularity was a factor in the demise of the Federalist Party." - Encyclopedia Britannica. Howes H262. Shaw and Shoemaker 34875 (NUt). See Sabin 65785 (not recording this imprint). Small triangular chip from lower fore-edge margin, no text affected, top edge trimmed a bit for binding, affecting an old signature at the top edge of the title page, but not affecting any of the typography, a very good copy. This printing is uncommon. (#155735).

Price: $100.00

See more items by ,
Printing identification statement for this book:
"Coming Soon"