The doomed Yosemite sugar pines. The important problem of saving what is left of the famous sugar pine forests of the Yosemite still unsolved. The best known part of the region, familiar to hundreds of thousands of tourists, still in control of the lumbermen and menaced with destruction [caption title]. EMERGENCY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE.

The doomed Yosemite sugar pines. The important problem of saving what is left of the famous sugar pine forests of the Yosemite still unsolved. The best known part of the region, familiar to hundreds of thousands of tourists, still in control of the lumbermen and menaced with destruction [caption title]. [New York: Emergency Conservation Committee, December 1931.]. 22.5 cm, pp. [1] 2-16, 9 illustrations, 2 maps, pictorial self wrappers, stapled. First edition. Cover title reads: "Doomed Yosemite Forests." When Yosemite National Park was established, extensive private in holdings, many owned by lumber companies, remained within the perimeter of the park. Additionally, many fine strands of timber units were excluded from the park by the boundary adjustments of 1905 and 1906. Extensive logging commenced in some of these areas in 1923. After considerable public controversy, Congress appropriated $1,600,000 to be matched by private contributions to purchase additional land for the park. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. provided the necessary funds and about 12,000 acres were added to the park between 1928 and 1930. However, much desirable land remained outside park boundaries. This pamphlet sought protection for trees on the ridge between the Merced and Tuolumne watersheds, along the south and middle forks of the Tuolumne River, and along Cottonwood Creek. A fine copy. (#166031).

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