BEYOND THE MISSISSIPPI: FROM THE GREAT RIVER TO THE GREAT OCEAN. LIFE AND ADVENTURE ON THE PRAIRIES, MOUNTAINS, AND PACIFIC COAST. WITH MORE THAN TWO HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS, FROM PHOTOGRAPHS AND ORIGINAL SKETCHES, OF THE PRAIRIES, DESERTS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, MINES, CITIES, INDIANS, TRAPPERS, PIONEERS, AND GREAT NATURAL CURIOSITIES OF THE NEW STATES AND TERRITORIES. 1857--1867. By Albert D. Richardson ... Issued by Subscription Only. Albert Richardson.

BEYOND THE MISSISSIPPI: FROM THE GREAT RIVER TO THE GREAT OCEAN. LIFE AND ADVENTURE ON THE PRAIRIES, MOUNTAINS, AND PACIFIC COAST. WITH MORE THAN TWO HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS, FROM PHOTOGRAPHS AND ORIGINAL SKETCHES, OF THE PRAIRIES, DESERTS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, MINES, CITIES, INDIANS, TRAPPERS, PIONEERS, AND GREAT NATURAL CURIOSITIES OF THE NEW STATES AND TERRITORIES. 1857--1867. By Albert D. Richardson ... Issued by Subscription Only. Hartford, Conn ... American Publishing Company ... , 1867. 22x14 cm, pp. [i-iv] [i] ii [iii] iv-vii [viii-ix] x-xvi [17] 18-572, flyleaves at front and rear, illustrations, including an illustrated title page by Thomas Nast, double-page map, other maps in the text, original decorated green cloth, front panel stamped in gold and blind, spine panel stamped in gold, rear panel stamped in blind, brown coated endpapers. First edition, first printing with title page dated 1867. American journalist Albert Deane Richardson (1833-1869) was born in Franklin, Massachusetts. When "eighteen years old he set out for the West and got as far as Pittsburgh ... In 1852 he went to Cincinnati, where he remained for five years, writing for various newspapers and acquiring local renown as an able, alert, energetic writer. In April 1855 he married Mary Louise of Cincinnati, by whom he had five children. His longing for Western adventure still unsatisfied, he took his family in 1857 to Sumner, Kansas, near Atchison, but spent much of his time at Leavenworth, Lawrence, and Topeka as correspondent for the Boston Journal. He served for short periods as adjutant-general of the Territory and secretary of the legislature and campaigned in behalf of free soil. In 1859 he accompanied Horace Greeley and Henry Villard to Pike's Peak and returned by himself through the Southwest, which was then little-known territory. Thereafter, until his death, he was connected with the New York Daily Tribune ... [During the American Civil War] he ... became the chief correspondent for the Tribune in the theatre of war ... In the spring of 1865 he went to California with Schuyler Colfax, Samuel Bowles, and Lieut.-Governor William Bross of Illinois. From his newspaper correspondence he compiled two books, The Secret Service, the Field, the Dungeon, and the Escape (1865) and Beyond the Mississippi (1867), which were sold by subscription and were enormously popular. His style was clear, concrete, and popular in tone" (DAB). Beyond the Mississippi includes a chapter, pages 420-435, describing his trip to Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Big Tree Grove in August 1865 as a member of a party of seventeen, including his companions of the overland trip as well as William Ashburner of the California Geological Survey, Frederick Law Olmsted, "who with his family, with horses, tents and books, remained for several weeks, moving from day to day, and encamping wherever fancy dictated" (p. 429), and others. Includes a favorable description of James Mason Hutchings and his hotel in Yosemite Valley and a briefer description of Galen Clark and his humble accommodations at Clark's Station. Of Yosemite Richardson enthused: "On the whole, Yosemite is incomparably the most wonderful feature of our continent. European travelers agree that transatlantic scenery has nothing at all approaching it. Unless the unexplored Himalayas hide some rival, there is no spot, the wide world over, of such varied beauty and measureless grandeur" (p. 429). Several of the engraved illustrations of Yosemite were based on early photographs made by Carleton E. Watkins. Published shortly before the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869, this popular account of travel in the American West, reprinted several times in large quantity, was an enormously influential work promoting the West as a destination for the traveler, both tourist and settler. "Twenty years ago, half our continent was an unknown land, and the Rocky Mountains were our Pillars of Hercules. Five years hence, the Orient will be our next-door neighbor ... It is discreditable to Americans -- peculiarly so to those with means and leisure for traveling abroad -- that they know little of this geography; little of the greatness, richness and beauty of our national inheritance. In exhaustlessness and variety of resources, no other country on the globe equals ours beyond the Mississippi. In grand natural curiosities and wonders, all other countries combined fall far below it" (preface). Cowan (1933) p. 531. Flake 7256. Rader 2782. Raines, p. 173. Rocq (1970) 16026. Sabin 70980. Old bookplate of James Stuart McCall on the front paste-down. Some light wear and soiling to cloth, several small stains and abrasions to the front endpapers, a few gatherings age-darkened, a clean, tight, better than average copy of a book often found in tatty condition. (#166323).

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