CALIFORNIA, IN-DOORS AND OUT; OR, HOW WE FARM, MINE, AND LIVE GENERALLY IN THE GOLDEN STATE. BY ELIZA W. FARNHAM. Eliza Woodson Farnham.

CALIFORNIA, IN-DOORS AND OUT; OR, HOW WE FARM, MINE, AND LIVE GENERALLY IN THE GOLDEN STATE. BY ELIZA W. FARNHAM. New York: Dix, Edwards & Co., 321 Broadway, 1856. 17.8x11.5 cm (12mo), pp. [i-iii] iv-vii [viii-ix] x-xiv [xv-xvi] [1] 2-508 + 8-page catalogue dated 1 September 1856 inserted at rear, original brown cloth, front and rear panels stamped in blind, spine panel stamped in gold, yellow endpapers. First edition. Firsthand account of life in California during the early Gold Rush days written by the widow of Thomas Jefferson Farnham (1804-1848), who traveled extensively in the American west in the 1840s. He settled in California in 1846 where he died in San Francisco on September 13, 1848. Following Farnham's death, his widow Eliza Woodson Farnham (1815-1864), feminist, author, lecturer, abolitionist, and activist for prison reform, and their two children left New York and traveled to California, by way of the Isthmus of Panama, to settle her husband's estate. She arrived in San Francisco in 1849 and took up residence on a farm in Santa Cruz County. She remained in California until 1856. "A talented feminist ... comments on life and social conditions in California ... she it was who said that 'there is little in the condition of California society, up to this date, to engage the higher orders of female intelligence'" (Wheat, Gold Rush). "Aside from the customary moral reflections common to many writers, her book contains much that is worthy of interest, presenting a fairly clear view of the formation of the vigilance committee in 1856" (Cowan). "While providing important observations of California in general, chapters XXXV through XXXVIII are devoted to the mines ... Eliza attracted the notice of many chroniclers of the Gold Rush because of her famous circular to attract women to California. In this circular, she wrote: 'It would exceed the limits of this circular to hint at the benefits that would flow to the growing population of that wonderful region from the introduction among them of intelligent, virtuous and efficient women'" (Kurutz). Cowan (1933) p. 203. Kurutz 232. Rocq 16835. Sabin 23861. Wheat, Gold Rush 72. Mild wear at edges, gold lettering on spine panel dull, a very good copy. (#167042).

Price: $850.00

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