FLATHEAD COUNTY FACTS ... REMEMBER THE POINT OF ENTRY TO THE GREAT FLATHEAD INDIAN RESERVATION IS: KALISPELL, MONTANA [caption title]. Native Americans, Montana, Flathead County, Flathead Reservation.
FLATHEAD COUNTY FACTS ... REMEMBER THE POINT OF ENTRY TO THE GREAT FLATHEAD INDIAN RESERVATION IS: KALISPELL, MONTANA [caption title].

FLATHEAD COUNTY FACTS ... REMEMBER THE POINT OF ENTRY TO THE GREAT FLATHEAD INDIAN RESERVATION IS: KALISPELL, MONTANA [caption title]. Kalispell, Montana: Kalispell Chamber of Commerce, n.d. [1905?]. Folio sheet, 28x43.6 cm, folded to make four pages, separate map sheet laid in. A flyer promoting acquisition of land on the Flathead reservation, to be opened to settlement by lottery after the "Indians now on the reservation" have received "their allotments of lands ..." The "Map of Flathead County, Montana and Flathead Indian Reservation," approximately 23.5x19.5 cm (9 1/8 x 7 3/4 inches), is printed in black, blue and red on a larger sheet with explanatory text above the map that reads in part: "Map of Flathead County, Montana. Showing Flathead Indian Reservation to be thrown open for settlement, probably in 1906. 1,250,000 acres of fine land." The text includes a list of facts regarding Flathead County and Indian Reservation. It is undated, but statistics from 1904 are cited. Page 2 is a reprint of an article by Congressman Joseph M. Dixon who "Tells How to Secure Homesteads and Timber Lands Upon the Flathead Indian Reservation.” Page 3 prints questions and their answers provided by the Kalispell Chamber of Commerce. "In 1855 the United States made the Treaty of Hellgate, by which it set aside a reservation solely for use of the Flathead ... By the late 19th and early 20th century, the federal government had adopted a policy of allotting lands to individual Indian households from their communal holdings, in order to encourage subsistence farming and adoption of European-American ways. Such allotments took place in what became the state of Oklahoma, former Indian Territory, in order to extinguish Indian land claims. Although the Flathead opposed such European-style allotments and farming, the United States Congress passed the 1904 Flathead Allotment Act. After allotments of land to individual households of members on the tribal rolls, the government declared the rest of the communal land to be 'surplus' and opened the reservation to homesteading for white settlement. United States Senator Joseph M. Dixon of Montana played a key role in getting this legislation passed. Its passage caused much resentment by the Flathead as homesteaders started fencing the land, claiming water rights from streams and diverting water for irrigation" (Wikipedia). Edges worn, first page tanned and frayed along the fore-edge, map has several stains and the top margin is spotted, a good copy overall. OCLC reports no copies of this flyer. (#167436).

Price: $450.00

Printing identification statement for this book:
"Coming Soon"