IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION[,] SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 1894 [cover title]. California, San Francisco, 1894 Midwinter Fair.
IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION[,] SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 1894 [cover title].

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION[,] SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 1894 [cover title]. N.p., n.d. 1894. Single sheet 15x376 cm ( 6 x 148 inches), folded accordion style into an oblong cloth portfolio, 24.5x16 cm, sixteen panels with illustrations captioned in English, German, French and Spanish, original green cloth, front panel stamped in gold. First edition. Exceptional views of San Francisco and the exhibits and grounds of the 1894 Midwinter Fair on a single sheet just over twelve feet long. The California Midwinter Fair, held in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, was extremely successful: it made money while promoting winter travel to the Golden State. "The California Midwinter International Exposition of 1894 was the state's first international event and as such, was a landmark in her history. Purposely held in winter, it showcased the the glorious climate of the Golden State and followed on the heels of the vastly successful World's Columbian Exhibition held in Chicago in 1893 ... The fair did much to attract visitors to California ... The Midwinter Fair was extremely successful and had a lasting impact not only in San Francisco but also in the state's southern realm ... San Francisco was host to another international event two decades after the Midwinter Fair: in 1914, one of the most important events in California history took place there -- the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Although the PPIE was larger and grander that its predecessor, its heritage may be traced to the pioneering Midwinter Fair of 1894" (Victoria Dailey, California's First International Exposition: The Midwinter Fair of 1894). This souvenir album was manufactured in Germany by what became known as the Glaser/Frey lithographic process ... The illustrations were done from photographs, with the lithographers making some alterations by adding or deleting details … Louis Glaser of Leipzig and Charles Frey of Frankfurt am Main used a multi-stone lithographic process to achieve a monochromatic effect that seems to have been rare if not unknown among American lithographers. Using five or more stones, they laid down a series of separate shades ranging from white to light sepia-gray to the darkest sepia-gray or black. The finished lithograph has a varnished look that creates greater illusion of depth than a simple lithograph or toned lithograph ... (Ron Tyler). A fine copy. Superior condition for this delicate piece. (#167659).

Price: $250.00

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